WEA News

L.A. Estate Immortalized in ‘The Godfather’ Lists (Again) for $135 Million

The Beverly Hills property that was owned by William Randolph Hearst, and hosted the Kennedys during their honeymoon, had previously been asking up to $195 million.

A Beverly Hills estate that was memorably featured in the movie “The Godfather”—and has been on and off the market for at least a decade—is for sale again, this time for $135 million.

Listed in 2007 for $165 million, the property returned to market in 2016 for $195 million. It failed to find a buyer and was taken off the market.

Known as the Beverly House, the elaborate, Spanish Colonial-style mansion was featured in “The Godfather” in a scene in which an enemy of Vito Corleone finds a severed head of a horse in his bed. In real life, it was owned at one point by newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, and later by actress Marion Davies. Jacqueline and John F. Kennedy also spent part of their honeymoon there.

The seller is Leonard Ross, an attorney and real-estate investor. Mr. Ross renovated the home in the mid-1990s and has been renting it out for events, according to a spokesman for one of the listing agents.

In 2016, Mr. Ross attempted to refinance the property for $40 million using crowdfunding website StartEngine, according to a company statement. A spokesman for StartEngine said the offering was not successful.

The property has six different structures totaling 50,000 square feet, including the Hearst property, which dates back to 1927, and a seven-bedroom house on a second parcel. There are more than 20 bedrooms and suites, depending on the use of the rooms.

The property also has a near Olympic-size swimming pool, a lighted tennis court, two screening rooms, a commercial grade kitchen and terraces to accommodate 400 or more guests for a seated dinner, according to a statement from the brokerages listing the property.

The property is listed by Drew Fenton of Hilton & Hyland, Jade Mills of Coldwell Banker Global Luxury, Kurt Rappaport of Westside Estate Agency and Aaron Kirman of Pacific Union International.

Click here to read the full article on wsj.com.